As some of you may know, up until very recently I’ve been working on a book called Windows Phone 7 for iPhone Developers. This book is all about learning how to build Windows Phone 7 applications, even if you’ve never written any code for Windows or for the iPhone before. Despite the iPhone name in the title, the book is just as useful for any new mobile application developer, regardless of background. Comparisons to the iPhone are made just to make some of the concepts in the book easier to grasp for new developers.

Anyway, the last chapter in that book deals with deploying applications to the Windows Phone Marketplace. In order to get screenshots for that chapter and to be able to accurately describe the application submission process, I had to create an application and submit it to the Marketplace.

That application is called Apocalypse Trainer. It’s a simple calorie counter and weight log application, with a twist. Instead of just calling itself a calorie counter, it disguises the act of counting calories with preparing for the zombie apocalypse. Every time you eat 100 calories, a zombie gets close to attacking you. Every time you burn 100 calories, you outrun a zombie. Finally, it keeps track of the number of consecutive days you’ve been under your calorie budget and refers to this as the number of days since the last mauling.

Here’s a screenshot of the application as it looks in the Zune Marketplace:

Apocalypse Trainer

Apocalypse Trainer in the Zune Marketplace

Make no mistake, this is not an application that I intend to make a million dollars from. In fact, I sincerely doubt anyone will actually purchase this application. I deliberately set the application at $2.99 to avoid using up any of my “free app” quota and because I know the application lacks the fit and finish of a commercial application. If, by some random freak chance, people actually start buying and using this application, I’ve engaged the services of an actual designer (I may be a great programmer, but I’m a horrible designer). I figure if 20 people buy the application, I will have enough money to pay him to do the layout and artwork for version 1.5. I’ve seen some preliminary designs and am really happy.

Anyway, I will also be doing a series of blog posts recounting my experiences while writing this application. This is for the benefit of readers of my book (publish date is I believe February or March 2011) and for the readers of this blog who are interested in Windows Phone 7 and the overall experience of deploying an application to the Marketplace.